BatCrack Radio Delay

Developer: Jacob Rodriguez

Current Version: 2.0.0

Last Updated: 3 years ago

Download Size: 14.2 MB - Download

Description:

PLEASE NOTE: Many new Mac laptops do not include a physical 1/8" input. If you have one of these computers and want to use BatCrack, you can purchase a third party USB audio interface from many retailers. Please email support for more information on this.

Don't you love it when your favorite team makes the playoffs or is otherwise playing in some high profile game which is being broadcast nationally on some major network rather than with your local broadcast team? But don't you hate it that you can't listen to your favorite local radio broadcasters especially in the very biggest games of the year?!? Well the obvious answer is to turn the TV volume down and watch the game while listening to the local radio announcers. Unfortunately, the TV broadcast of the game is usually delayed by anywhere from 6 seconds to several minutes whereas the radio broadcast has no such delay on it, making syncing up the radio broadcast and TV broadcast highly annoying and nearly impossible.

BatCrack Radio Delay is a simple utility to delay your incoming audio by a user-definable amount. All you need is a radio and a small cable to connect the radio to the audio input on your Mac. After connecting up, fire up BatCrack, turn up the volume and set a delay time. With a few seconds of trial and error, you can fine tune the delay time to perfectly sync up the swing with the crack of the bat! Now you're listening to your favorite announcers during the most important games of the year!

The easiest way to enjoy BatCrack Radio Delay is to use a transistor radio and a 1/8 inch (3.5mm) stereo mini-to-mini cable.

Plug one end of the cable to the audio output (or headphone out) of your radio, plug the other end into the line input of your Mac.

Turn on your radio and turn up the radio's volume. You probably won't hear anything yet.

Fire up BatCrack. Make sure to choose 'Built-in Input' for your Input, and 'Built-in Output' for your Output.

Turn up the volume in BatCrack. You should hear your radio. Make sure it's properly tuned to your favorite sports broadcast. If you hear a lot of distortion, try turning down the volume on your radio until the distortion goes away.

Once you have a decent sounding signal coming through BatCrack, go ahead and try different delay times. Most TV broadcasts will be delayed by at least 10 seconds, and sometimes as much as several minutes. Start with 15 seconds (a good starting place) and keep adding or subtracting time until you feel the TV and Radio are in sync.

Enjoy the game. I hope your team wins! (Unless they're playing against my team!)

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Release Notes:

Now redesigned with a new dead-simple interface.
New ability to save and load delay settings.

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Most Helpful Reviews

5/5
Version 2.0.0
Review by Giants Fan M

WORKS GREAT! - Bat Crack works perfectly, allowing me to listen to KNBR radio in sync to TV. I am using an older MAC laptop, sending AM radio output to MAC audio in jack and then sending audio out to external speakers. It just takes a minute to adjust, about 18-23 seconds in delay. Make sure you set the to volume high on the Bat Crack slider. GO GIANTS! (and goodbye Joe Buck) What a post season!!!

Found helpful by 6 out of 6 people
1/5
Version 1.0.1
Review by sgginc

Crashes on start on Mac Pro 10.8.3. - Crashes on start on Mac Pro 10.8.3. No way to contact developer. Too bad, great idea!!!

Found helpful by 2 out of 3 people

More Reviews for Current Version

5/5
Version 2.0.0
Review by Giants Fan M

WORKS GREAT! - Bat Crack works perfectly, allowing me to listen to KNBR radio in sync to TV. I am using an older MAC laptop, sending AM radio output to MAC audio in jack and then sending audio out to external speakers. It just takes a minute to adjust, about 18-23 seconds in delay. Make sure you set the to volume high on the Bat Crack slider. GO GIANTS! (and goodbye Joe Buck) What a post season!!!

Found helpful by 6 out of 6 people
5/5
Version 2.0.0
Review by lovekruk&kuip

The “Joe Buck Filter" - I would give this 50 stars if I could. It saved us from having to listen to Joe Buck drone on against the Giants, and gave us the pleasure of listening to our fabulous local broadcasters during the 2014 playoffs through the World Series. I followed the directions provided by the developer which were very helpful. But in case anyone else utilizes MLB At Bat, I’ll list my procedure I subscribe to MLB At Bat, so we used that as the audio source on a Mac hooked up to the TV. Select the appropriate audio stream Make sure SoundSiphon is active Make sure the audio out is muted Launch BatCrack Radio Delay. Adjust the audio level. Play with the delay until it is synced. I wish this was available for my iPhone. It would be easier to set it up there and listen to it on the stereo via Bluetooth.

Found helpful by 5 out of 5 people
5/5
Version 2.0.0
Review by jollyLibrtarian

Need help delaying system audio? This does the job - I was trying to find a way to get MLB Gameday Audio to sync with postseason TV broadcasts, and this app does it brilliantly. I’d like to explain how to do this for users who may not have it completely figured out. First, you’ll need a copy of Sound Siphon to enable using your Mac’s system sound as an input for apps like BatCrack. Just get the demo version from the developer’s website; you only need the paid version if you want to pass through audio from specific apps. Passing through all of your Mac’s audio is totally free, even though you’ll get a registration prompt when you launch the app. Once you’ve started up Sound Siphon and switched it to “On,” hold down the alt/option key and click the volume icon in your menubar. Your output device should be set to “Sound Siphon.” Next, launch BatCrack, and set your desired delay either by clicking on the box and dragging or by clicking and then typing in your desired delay. Also pay attention to the volume slider in the BatCrack window – it’s muted by default, so if you want it to play your delayed audio at the same level you have your system volume set to, drag the slider all the way to the right. (When you do this, it should say 0.0 dB.) Make sure you have your “Audio In” set to “Sound Siphon” and your “Audio Out” set to built-in, or whatever output device you have plugged in to your Mac, if that’s relevant to you. Now you’re ready to go! Fire up Gameday Audio and your delay should be properly set up. If you’re having trouble with the volume, or if you’re hearing the non-delayed audio overlapping the delayed audio, alt-click the volume icon again to go to Sound Preferences and make sure the “Mute” box is ticked under for Sound Siphon in the “Output” tab. You can also adjust the volume slider for your internal speakers in this window (or for whatever output device you’re using) so it’s set to the preferred level. Just make sure you select “Sound Siphon” as your output again before you exit the System Preferences window. I highly recommend BatCrack for anyone who wants to sync TV and radio broadcasts for sporting events. The interface could be a little more user-friendly, but this is a great app that does just what it’s supposed to do!

Found helpful by 5 out of 5 people
4/5
Version 2.0.0
Review by MO_sisu

Very good…only missing one thing - Very good - in fact, it’s great. Would be perfect if it had an EQ!

Found helpful by 1 out of 1 people
5/5
Version 2.0.0
Review by Sierpinski99

Wow!!! Works great and saved me $199! - This app works incredibly well. I was searching for a device that did this very thing so I can watch my Broncos while listenig to the local radio during Super Bowl 50. I was ready to shell out $200 for a device that does what this app can do for a buck. The interface is clean and simple. I tested it out this afternoon and was able to delay audio by 75 seconds (I’m sure more, I just didn’t try) with no perceptible decrease in sound quality. The volume seemed to decrease sightly, but that’s it. I never write app reviews, but this one was too exciting to let go. Take heed the warning that many newer macs don’t have the proper headphone input, and an adapter may be required. What an app! Wow!

Found helpful by 1 out of 1 people
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